Lights the Sky

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swellshark:

34. i belong deeply to myself

— 5 hours ago with 12 notes
"Wilderness. The word itself is music."
Edward Abbey (via lunafirefly)

(Source: whats-out-there, via lunafirefly)

— 1 day ago with 74 notes
helenahaglund:

Ane, July 28th, Arendal, Norway / Instagram: @helenahaglund

helenahaglund:

Ane, July 28th, Arendal, Norway / Instagram: @helenahaglund

(via carpe-yesterdiem)

— 1 day ago with 43 notes
"For art to be ‘un-political’ means only to ally itself with the ruling group."
Bertolt Brecht - A Short Organum for the Theatre  (via adult-mag)

(Source: bustakay, via nathanielstuart)

— 1 day ago with 2648 notes
"Male fantasies, male fantasies, is everything run by male fantasies? Up on a pedestal or down on your knees, it’s all a male fantasy: that you’re strong enough to take what they dish out, or else too weak to do anything about it. Even pretending you aren’t catering to male fantasies is a male fantasy: pretending you’re unseen, pretending you have a life of your own, that you can wash your feet and comb your hair unconscious of the ever-present watcher peering through the keyhole, peering through the keyhole in your own head, if nowhere else. You are a woman with a man inside watching a woman. You are your own voyeur."

Margaret Atwood, The Robber Bride

I follow Margaret Atwood on twitter because she interacts with really funny nature accounts (she’ll rt something like @DucksIncorporated or @Birdwatchersunited and the tweet will be like, “The beautiful spring feathers of the meadowlark.”) Anyway. It’s easy to forget that she’s also a very dank writer.

(via christinefriar)

You are a woman with a man inside watching a woman.

This line, oof.

Been spending a lot of time lately trying to untangle how a lifetime of patriarchy has fucked up my own sexual agency. Nothing like getting derailed inside your own head by worries of how you look in the moment, whether you measure up to some external standard…

(via queeracula)

(Source: ricebowls, via nathanielstuart)

— 1 day ago with 3317 notes
cultofkimber:

Yo, the water glass should actually be directly above the dinner knife. The wine glasses should either be arranged immediately to the right and/or slightly in front of the water because drinks should always be poured from the right. Also, the silverware should actually be aligned with the bottom edge of the charger. If this were really on a table, you’d want an inch between the charger and the edge of the table—and, while the charger can be left on the table during dinner (it’s often removed as soon as everyone has unfolded their napkins), it’s always removed before dessert is served. (When dessert is served, you’d also remove the wine glasses and bread-and-butter plate, leaving only the water glass. Dessert is often served with coffee/tea or immediately before.)
Silverware really depends on the number and type of courses being served. Like, this is for a pretty basic four-course meal (soup, salad, main course, dessert). More courses = more silverware. All you really need to know is that silverware and plates are always placed in the order of use. Forks always go on the left; knives then spoons to the right (knife blades facing left); and dessert silverware above (fork tongs pointing right). The only exception is specialty forks, like oyster forks, which should go on the out-most right. And, generally speaking, you shouldn’t put more than three of any type of utensil on the table at a time (specialty forks don’t count as forks, tho); additional silverware is usually brought out with each course. 
Also, if anyone knows where that cute floral plate comes from, I’d appreciate that info.

Everything that she said.
And the pudding cutlery on the top of the plate like that is now considered rather old-fashioned and is usually placed inside next to the charger - royal events excluded. 

cultofkimber:

Yo, the water glass should actually be directly above the dinner knife. The wine glasses should either be arranged immediately to the right and/or slightly in front of the water because drinks should always be poured from the right. Also, the silverware should actually be aligned with the bottom edge of the charger. If this were really on a table, you’d want an inch between the charger and the edge of the table—and, while the charger can be left on the table during dinner (it’s often removed as soon as everyone has unfolded their napkins), it’s always removed before dessert is served. (When dessert is served, you’d also remove the wine glasses and bread-and-butter plate, leaving only the water glass. Dessert is often served with coffee/tea or immediately before.)

Silverware really depends on the number and type of courses being served. Like, this is for a pretty basic four-course meal (soup, salad, main course, dessert). More courses = more silverware. All you really need to know is that silverware and plates are always placed in the order of use. Forks always go on the left; knives then spoons to the right (knife blades facing left); and dessert silverware above (fork tongs pointing right). The only exception is specialty forks, like oyster forks, which should go on the out-most right. And, generally speaking, you shouldn’t put more than three of any type of utensil on the table at a time (specialty forks don’t count as forks, tho); additional silverware is usually brought out with each course. 

Also, if anyone knows where that cute floral plate comes from, I’d appreciate that info.

Everything that she said.

And the pudding cutlery on the top of the plate like that is now considered rather old-fashioned and is usually placed inside next to the charger - royal events excluded. 

(Source: stayy0ungandwild)

— 1 week ago with 5698 notes
"A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do."
Bob Dylan (via nathanielstuart)
— 1 week ago with 23 notes

arsvallis:

biologicallyfemale:

*reads foucault*

*nods while not understanding*

*rereads foucault*
*realizes that in nodding in agreement to a text upheld by the academy and your peers as an informative text you’ve internalized a power relation from a specific assemblage of knowledge and ideas, so while you didn’t understand foucault the first time you understood power and its effect on the body intuitively*

(via bourbonandsmoke)

— 2 weeks ago with 5604 notes