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cultofkimber:

Yo, the water glass should actually be directly above the dinner knife. The wine glasses should either be arranged immediately to the right and/or slightly in front of the water because drinks should always be poured from the right. Also, the silverware should actually be aligned with the bottom edge of the charger. If this were really on a table, you’d want an inch between the charger and the edge of the table—and, while the charger can be left on the table during dinner (it’s often removed as soon as everyone has unfolded their napkins), it’s always removed before dessert is served. (When dessert is served, you’d also remove the wine glasses and bread-and-butter plate, leaving only the water glass. Dessert is often served with coffee/tea or immediately before.)
Silverware really depends on the number and type of courses being served. Like, this is for a pretty basic four-course meal (soup, salad, main course, dessert). More courses = more silverware. All you really need to know is that silverware and plates are always placed in the order of use. Forks always go on the left; knives then spoons to the right (knife blades facing left); and dessert silverware above (fork tongs pointing right). The only exception is specialty forks, like oyster forks, which should go on the out-most right. And, generally speaking, you shouldn’t put more than three of any type of utensil on the table at a time (specialty forks don’t count as forks, tho); additional silverware is usually brought out with each course. 
Also, if anyone knows where that cute floral plate comes from, I’d appreciate that info.

Everything that she said.
And the pudding cutlery on the top of the plate like that is now considered rather old-fashioned and is usually placed inside next to the charger - royal events excluded. 

cultofkimber:

Yo, the water glass should actually be directly above the dinner knife. The wine glasses should either be arranged immediately to the right and/or slightly in front of the water because drinks should always be poured from the right. Also, the silverware should actually be aligned with the bottom edge of the charger. If this were really on a table, you’d want an inch between the charger and the edge of the table—and, while the charger can be left on the table during dinner (it’s often removed as soon as everyone has unfolded their napkins), it’s always removed before dessert is served. (When dessert is served, you’d also remove the wine glasses and bread-and-butter plate, leaving only the water glass. Dessert is often served with coffee/tea or immediately before.)

Silverware really depends on the number and type of courses being served. Like, this is for a pretty basic four-course meal (soup, salad, main course, dessert). More courses = more silverware. All you really need to know is that silverware and plates are always placed in the order of use. Forks always go on the left; knives then spoons to the right (knife blades facing left); and dessert silverware above (fork tongs pointing right). The only exception is specialty forks, like oyster forks, which should go on the out-most right. And, generally speaking, you shouldn’t put more than three of any type of utensil on the table at a time (specialty forks don’t count as forks, tho); additional silverware is usually brought out with each course. 

Also, if anyone knows where that cute floral plate comes from, I’d appreciate that info.

Everything that she said.

And the pudding cutlery on the top of the plate like that is now considered rather old-fashioned and is usually placed inside next to the charger - royal events excluded. 

(Source: stayy0ungandwild)

— 1 week ago with 5695 notes
"A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do."
Bob Dylan (via nathanielstuart)
— 1 week ago with 23 notes

arsvallis:

biologicallyfemale:

*reads foucault*

*nods while not understanding*

*rereads foucault*
*realizes that in nodding in agreement to a text upheld by the academy and your peers as an informative text you’ve internalized a power relation from a specific assemblage of knowledge and ideas, so while you didn’t understand foucault the first time you understood power and its effect on the body intuitively*

(via bourbonandsmoke)

— 2 weeks ago with 5553 notes

adhemarpo:

He Jiaying, peintre chinois contemporain

(via didyoueatallthisacid)

— 3 weeks ago with 35530 notes
solexposure:

#arizona #adventureyourway

solexposure:

#arizona #adventureyourway

(via nathanielstuart)

— 4 weeks ago with 8 notes
"Some days breathing is both too much and not enough."
10 Word Poem" series - #88 (via lettersto-savemyself)

(via anditslove)

— 4 weeks ago with 6409 notes
"Read books.
Ride buses.
Take walks.
Speak to your loneliness."
Pavana पवन (via maza-dohta)
— 4 weeks ago with 721 notes

mymodernmet:

Solitary figures wander through vast, dreamlike worlds in artist Kasia Derwinska's striking images. Derwinska combines photography and digital manipulation to create surreal works of art that seem to act as metaphors for life, expressing themes like loneliness, isolation, separation, reflection, and joy as each figure contemplates their paths in life.

— 1 month ago with 799 notes

luminoussea:

“My mother boils seawater. It sits all afternoon simmering on the stovetop, almost two gallons in a big soup pot. The windows steam up and the house smells like a storm. In the evening, a crust of salt is all that’s left at the bottom of the pot. My mother scrapes it out with a spoon. We each lick a fingertip and dip them in the salt and it’s softer than you’d think, less like sand and more like snow. We lay our fingertips on our tongues, right in the middle. It tastes like salt but like something else, too—wide, and dark. It tastes like drowning, or like falling asleep on the shore and only waking up when the tide has come up to your feet and you wonder if you’d gone on sleeping, would you have sunk?”

The Alchemy: Salt from Water

(via didyoueatallthisacid)

— 1 month ago with 39419 notes